jelly printing with a gelatine plate

jelly printing for beginners

Even though it was purely the name that drew me in  (because I love jelly)  jelly printing has proved to be tremendous fun. Jelly Printing is a bit random; there’s no guarantee that when you lift the paper you’ll get exactly the print you were expecting. Over time the Gelatine Printing Plate changes too, which means that even if you did exactly the same for every single print, you’d still get variety. I get pretty easily bored by repetition, so it suits me fine. In The Barley Barn, Ruth and I have been teaching people how to make simple Jelly Prints like the one above, though Ruth has renamed it “Printing without a Press” to make it sound a little more adult like and serious. The truth is that Jelly Printing is a wonderfully easy printing method for any age.

If, in the spirit of home-spun creativeness or half-term entertainment, you fancy having a go at making some simple jelly prints using plants or feathers, then read on.

Firstly, you need to make your Gelatine Printing Plate. I suggest you start off with A5 size as it doesn’t take too much gelatine and it’s an easy size to work with. There are recipes all over the internet for making your own plate; some are made simply with gelatine and water, others include sugar, alcohol, glycerine or vinegar. I make my plates with powdered gelatine, water and glycerine using this recipe, which simply involves a bit of stirring and then pouring into a mould.

Once you’ve made your Gelatine Plate, you’re ready to print.

You will need:

  • A gelatine plate
  • A flat surface for your Gelatine Plate – a chopping mat, Perspex sheet, plastic tray, smooth glass shelf from a defunct fridge or Formica type worktop work well
  • A palette for your inks – again a chopping mat etc will do the job
  • A brayer (roller) – the sort used for lino printing
  • Water based printing Ink or Acrylic Paint
  • Flowers, leaves, grasses, feathers … avoid thick woody plants or anything with sharp thorns that will make holes in your Gelatine Plate
  • Paper, card or sticky labels

Get ready:

Gently ease your Gelatine Plate out of its mould and carefully plop it onto the board.

Squeeze a little ink (about a teaspoonful) or paint onto your palette and roll your brayer back and forth to coat the roller. If your ink seems very sticky, spritz over a little water to thin it.

Roll a thin layer of ink onto your gelatine plate. Don’t worry too much about getting a completely even coating as a little unevenness and texture can add interest to the finished print (I’m no perfectionist and can always find a creative excuse for being slapdash).

Lay down your plants on the gelatine plate, with the most textured side face down in the ink. Cover with a piece of paper and firmly smooth over with your hand, making sure you follow the contours of the plant and reach right into the corners of the paper. Remember that if the paper doesn’t come in contact with the gelatine plate then it won’t get any ink on it.

Pull your print:

Now, carefully peel back the paper and you have a silhouette print of your plant.

If you’ve laid down too thick a layer of ink you might want to take another silhouette print; it won’t be as dark as the first, but it will lift off any residual ink.

Lift the plants and feathers from the Gelatine Plate using your fingers or tweezers, which will leave a clear inked image on the gelatine plate. Take a clean sheet of paper and lay onto the Gelatine Plate, smooth it down with your hands and then peel it off. You should now have a wonderfully detailed print of your plant.

jelly printing labels - detailed prints

Try printing with different colours, layering one print on top of another. Print onto cheap newsprint, expensive art paper, pages torn from books, sticky labels, card or copier paper and make envelopes, gift tags and bookmarks. Tear up prints and make collages, use the prints for scrapbooking or art journals. Or just frame your amazing prints and admire them. The labels above are detailed prints and the envelope below is made from a silhouette print with blue ink overlaid with a silhouette print with yellow ink on photocopier paper.

jelly printing envelopes

Believe me, this is just the beginning. Have fun.

There’s a few ideas for Jelly Prints here on the Slamseys Art Pinterest board.

Autumn days

Lately, we’ve been …

autumn leaves

… enjoying autumn leaves. I wonder whether I shall ever reach the age when kicking autumn leaves is no longer a joy. I do hope not.

 

sloes

 

… picking sloes to make Sloe Gin. It’s proving to be a bumper year for sloes around here and it’s good to get the sloes picked on mild autumn days as I hate going out on freezing winter mornings when the bushes are wet and fingers chill to the bone as we pick. The sloes are already ripe and some are beginning to fall from the bushes so we’ve been out in force to pick them before it’s too late.

blackthorn

… not enjoying the vicious thorns of the blackthorn. Look carefully and you can see the thorns, ready to catch the unwary hand plunged into the bush in search of the fattest, juiciest sloes.

rhubarb

 

… enjoying the quiet decay of the garden in autumn. The rhubarb has finally keeled over, the leaves now draped over the edges of the bed as they quietly rot away. The beans have been taken down and the canes put away until spring, the last of the peas picked and the pumpkins cut and left to dry with the rampaging vegetation pulled up and composted. I rather like this time of clearing away and tidying up, though I confess that I’m not that diligent and there’s quite a lot that’s just left to go to seed and stand forlorn through winter.

 

pumpkin

 

… wondering what on earth I’m going to do with the pumpkins. We have only three pumpkins from our plants but they’re enormous and  I could feed (almost) half of Braintree with this one alone. I hear the call of Pumpkin Soup and Pumpkin Ice Cream but so far I’m just enjoying the sight of the pumpkins sitting out in the garden chairs, like old ladies taking in the sunshine.

 

Blackcurrant Gin, butterscotch bars, pears

 

… enjoying some autumnal food. Pears from the garden that have just hit the perfect ripeness; Butterscotch bars studded with walnuts and chocolate; a hot toddy of Blackcurrant Gin with a little lemon juice, honey and a splash of hot water (an almost virtuous drink with all that vitamin C and goodness).

Are you enjoying autumn days or are you bursting into springtime? Whichever, have a good weekend.

 

 

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