International Scone Week

Did you know it’s International Scone Week? Not an official week, but a Celia led excuse for everyone to have a bit of fun, bake some scones and post a photo up somewhere. Looking at last year’s scones and those that people have already written about this year makes me realise just how unadventurous I am with my scones. I only ever make three kinds of scones – plain scones, cheese scones or girdle scones and I don’t like sultanas in scones (or in apple pie).

girdle scones
Yesterday we had proper Sunday Tea with Home-made Cakes – including Lemon & Coconut Slice (recipe courtesy of Jane, The Shady Baker) , Jammy Dodgers  and of course scones. There’s no picture of a scone artistically posed on a pretty plate because we ate them all very quickly. My favourite way to eat scones is with clotted cream and jam, though warm scones with good butter is pretty tasty too. Do you spread the cream first or the jam? I like a dollop of cream followed by a good spoonful of jam but I noticed my sister-in-law spread butter then jam and topped it with cream.
Girdle scones are of course cooked on a girdle. Not the 18 hour Platex girdle that I thought went out of fashion twenty years ago, but actually still appears to be on sale, but a flat pan that sits on top of the hob. You can read about mine here. My aga is turned off at the moment and I was a bit wary of using the girdle on the induction hob, so  I used for a frying pan instead which worked  fine though the sides made it trickier to turn the scones. The scones are a little crustier than oven scones but still deliciously soft inside.

girdle sconesMy Mother’s Recipe for Girdle Scones

220g plain flour
1 teasp bicarbonate of soda
2 teasp cream of tartar
Pinch of salt
20g lard (or butter)
20g caster sugar
150ml milk

Heat the very lightly greased girdle (or pan) on the hob
Sift the flour, bicarb, tartar and salt into a bowl.
Rub in the lard and then stir in the sugar.
Add enough milk to make a soft but not sticky dough and then press into a circle about 1cm thick.
Cut your round into 8 wedges and slide each one onto your heated girdle.
Cook until brown – about 4 minutes each side – and wrap them in a clean tea towel on a wire rack.

Eat warm. With clotted cream and jam.

20 thoughts on “International Scone Week

  1. Jayne says:

    My son Christopher is the scone king and makes them a couple of times a month. The first time I had a scone was in New York City and they were served with lemon curd, clotted cream and tea, I will never forget how delicious it was! I have a difficult time finding clotted cream but when I do it’s such a treat 🙂

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    • Anne @GtSlamseysFarm says:

      Lemon curd and clotted cream on a scone sounds a delicious combination. Definitely one to try. We can get clotted cream in the supermarket now which is much easier than when we used to wait for someone to go to Cornwall for their hols. Can you believe that they used to send a tin of clotted cream home in the post.

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  2. Celia @ Fig Jam and Lime Cordial says:

    Ah yes, the Grandma’s Scottish girdle (not griddle), it’s coming back to me now! What an interesting recipe and the scones are making me hungry! What does the cream of tartar do? I think I’ve only ever used that to make playdough. And did you use lard or butter? I have lard in the freezer that I need something to do with – this could account for 20g of it.. 🙂

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    • Anne @GtSlamseysFarm says:

      Bicarb is an alkali, cream of tartar is an acid so when you add liquid they react to produce carbon dioxide – the heat then expands the bubbles and the scones rise. They’re just a home made Baking Powder. I use lard because that’s what my original recipe states, but if I don’t have any then butter works just as well. Pity we don’t live next door as I need lard to make rabbit confit.

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  3. heidiannie says:

    These are my favorite scones- my recipe was given to my mother from a friend who worked at the Red Cross with her and they were called Welsh scones- but it is almost the same recipe and the same method. Thanks for sharing- they look delicious!

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  4. Kathy says:

    Hi Anne, love your blog. Us Cornish down here in Cornwall wouldn’t dream of putting cream first and then jam. Cornish Clotted Cream is still available by post, a must for all my relatives up country for their birthday and Christmas treats.

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    • Anne @GtSlamseysFarm says:

      Thanks for commenting Kathy. We’re of Devon descent so maybe that’s why we put cream first! I didn’t realise Cornish Clotted Cream was still available by post – better check that out for Christmas.

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  5. cecilia says:

    I used to have a really heavy cast iron griddle (your say girdle I say griddle!! lovely) but i foolishly left it in New Zealand. granted it would have been unusual to pack a griddle when travelling but Oh i Miss it so. It was my mothers too. I suppose one of my sons has it now. She used to make griddle scones and when i have the woodstove on in the winter these are so fast to make. I LOVE dates in regular oven baked scones! with brown sugar sprinkled on and baked to sugary goodness. Yours look very tasty, perfect for high tea. I remember reading ages ago about you bringing in little posies of flowers each day from your garden and fields, do you still do that? (I am fairly sure it was you that did that) It was an inspiring moment for me, I m so busy growing everything i forget to pick a tiny bunch of perfection and bring it in.. c

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    • Anne @GtSlamseysFarm says:

      I’d never thought about putting dates in scones but it sounds very delicious, particularly with brown sugar sprinkled on top. You’re right I did used to try to pick flowers every week. It was so wet last year that I slipped out of the habit. Thanks for reminding me, I must start doing it again.

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  6. elaine says:

    I seem to be a bit late coming to this post, sorry about that – not sure about girdle/griddle scones, wouldn’t they be kinda uncooked inside just cooking them for a few minutes? I do love a conventional scon/scone though, strawberry jam on one half, clotted cream on the other, then squashed together – a favourite tea-time treat.

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